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revising my attitude to Scarfolk

Following a brief twitter conversation with @langrabbie and @owenhatherley about an old blog post I wrote on here : http://historytoday-navickas.blogspot.co.uk/2015/01/brutalgie-whats-wrong-with-scarfolk.html, I'd like to revise what I said about Scarfolk, the fictional world invented by Richard Littler, https://scarfolk.blogspot.co.uk/ 

At the time (Jan 2015), I complained that it was a little too obvious in its satire, and that it didn't seem to have a political purpose. What has happened since that date and today has made me rethink this - now, each new post by Littler is deliberately and often sharply political. And a few times, the news breaks and you're left thinking 'this is too bizarre/cruel/shocking, even for Scarfolk'.  

It's still perhaps not as perceptive and deep as the 'fakelore' of Hookland, but Scarfolk has indeed become much more relevant and topical.

York civic and election procession routes 1830s

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Sources:
Yorkshire Gazette, 29 July 1837 - York city election
York Herald, 24 June 1826 - Yorkshire county election
Yorkshire Gazette, 23 June 1838 - Coronation procession

report on my Luddite Lecture at Huddersfield, April 2017

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Here's a lovely write-up of the lecture I gave at the University of Huddersfield as their annual Luddite Lecturer: http://www.hud.ac.uk/news/2017/april/ludditememoriallecturebydrkatrinanavickas.php


comparison of Goad's insurance map with Google Earth 3D

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Manchester St Peter's Square, Goad's insurance map 1886, overlain on google earth with 3D buildings


comparison of Ancoats maps

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lower bit of Great Ancoats, 1849, 1934 slum clearance, and today.


200th anniversary of the March of the Blanketeers

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On Monday 10 March 1817, over five hundred men from Manchester and its surrounding towns met in St Peter’s Fields. Carrying blankets to sleep in at night, they set off to present a reform petition to the Prince Regent in London. The March of the Blanketeers evinced a bold determination to represent the grievances of the unrepresented, legally and directly, to the source of national power. The movement was the march, and the march was the movement.

The Manchester magistrates arrested the leaders on St Peter’s Fields, but not before about several hundred men had set off. About two hundred were arrested at Stockport bridge, but the postmaster of Macclesfield reported that multiple ‘groups of about twenty or thirty’ arrived in his town by four o’clock in the afternoon. That some got as far as Leek in Staffordshire, thirty miles from home, and one man apparently managed to reach London, was testimony to a belief in the connection their determination to defend the right to pe…